Category Archives: ICS699-Fall2008

Week 16: final report

Not much to say, continuing to work on my tech report, due this Friday 12/19. Found this amusing climate penance device, called the Thighmaster.

Planned items from last week:

  • [IN PROGRESS] Finish first draft of tech report
  • Read 3 new papers from literature review list
    • [DONE] Four month Moon and Mars crew water utilization study conducted at the Flashline Mars Arctic Research Station, Devon Island, Nunavut
    • [DONE] The Khazzoom-Brookes Postulate and Neoclassical Growth
    • [DONE] Fueling Our Transportation Future

Hours worked: 20 (target: 15 hr)

Plans for coming week:

  • Finish final draft of tech report, turn in to Philip
  • Read any papers I need to fill in gaps for the literature review

Pointers to work products:

Week 15: presentation and NSF day

Last week most of my effort sent into preparing for my presentation to the ICS 690 seminar. I posted the result on SlideShare. Most of the hard work was actually moving my proposal forward, after that, writing the presentation wasn’t too bad.

At the presentation, I got some useful feedback. Mark Stillwell pointed out something I had also been thinking about, which is that the idea of aggregating data from ubiquitous sensors for analysis has application for lots of other areas. One that I’ve explicitly thought about is Hackystat (automated collection of sensor data from software development for software process improvement), but I wonder if there are generalized techniques that can be used for analysis and motivation across domains.

Professor Binsted suggested that I think about how I might work with Better Place, as Hawaii has signed on to the Better Place network. Not sure what I would do with them, but it’s something to think about.

I spent Friday at NSF Day at the Hawaii Convention Center. There was a lot of useful information about NSF, the structure of the organization, and how to apply for grants. I’m not there yet, but it’s good to get the information from the horse’s mouth. The CISE directorate (I love saying directorate) is planning to start a Green IT project sometime in 2010 or 2011, which could be an interesting source of funding.

I didn’t get as much reading & writing done as I had hoped last week due to the focus on the presentation and NSF day. Planning to catch up this week.

Future thought: Beyond PET: what would happen if PET is a big success? Philip asked me to think about this, and I’m going to need some time to mull it over.

Planned items from last week:

  • [DONE] Make slides for ICS 690 presentation
  • [DONE] Practice ICS 690 presentation
  • [ONGOING] Continue writing tech report
  • Read 3 new papers from literature review list
    • [DONE] IPCC report 4 Synthesis report
    • [NOT DONE] Dormitory residents reduce electricity consumption when exposed to real-time visual feedback and incentives
    • [DONE] A Bright Green Perspective On Sustainable Choices

Other accomplishments this week:

  • Tech report bibliography now only lists works cited, and doesn’t show annotations. The proposal still has the full annotated biblio.
  • Attended NSF Day, learned a lot about NSF, CSIE, and grant writing

Hours worked: 25 (target: 15 hr)

Plans for coming week:

  • Finish first draft of tech report
  • Read 3 new papers from literature review list
    • To be specified later, based on the tech report draft

Pointers to work products:

Cool links:

  • WebCite is a solution to the problem of citing URLs in scholarly works. You can provide them with any URL, and they will archive it and provide you with a permanent URL that will show that page as it was when you archived it. The goal is to allow scholars to cite URLs without worrying that the content will change in the future or simply disappear. This should remove some of the reservations people have about citing URLs.

Week 14: TED API and first draft

I read an interesting paper about carbon neutrality and carbon offsets. They conclude that the path from retail payment for an offset to actual projects can be long and complicated, and that one should examine the details of the projects funded by the offsets closely. They have also evaluated a variety of carbon footprint calculators, which often go hand in hand with the sale of offsets.

After reading this paper on using whole-home energy meters to break down electricity usage, I’m thinking about buying The Energy Detective (TED) for use at home. The cost for a meter plus the computer software for downloading data is less than $200. Interestingly, they now have an API available, though you have to email them for details. However, the API must be pretty functional, since there is now a TED toolbar for Firefox. It would be nice to finally get some data so I can start doing some implementation work.

I’ve started writing more on the tech report, but it can’t really be called a first draft yet. Writing should be easier now since I have read a lot of the papers I was planning to write about. I should be writing about a page a day at this point.

On Thursday I am giving a 30-minute presentation to ICS 690, so I need to work on that. Friday I’m attending the all-day NSF workshop on developing proposals.

Planned items from last week:

  • [IN PROGRESS] Write first draft of tech report
  • Read 2 new papers from literature review list
    • [DONE] Carbon neutral – sense and sensibility
    • [DONE] How Much Energy Are We Using? Potential of Residential Energy Demand Feedback Devices
  • Write up notes from papers read during PET paper lit review
    • [DONE] Promoting Environmentally Sustainable Behaviors Using Social Marketing In Emerging Persuasive Technologies
  • [NOT DONE] Finish running through carbon metric calculators

Other accomplishments this week:

  • Figured out how to make a LaTeX macro for CO2, which I was typing a lot

Hours worked: 15 (target: 15 hr)

Plans for coming week:

  • Make slides for ICS 690 presentation
  • Practice ICS 690 presentation
  • Continue writing tech report
  • Read 3 new papers from literature review list
    • IPCC report 4 summary
    • Dormitory residents reduce electricity consumption when exposed to real-time visual feedback and incentives
    • A Bright Green Perspective On Sustainable Choices

Pointers to work products:

Cool links:

  • None

Week 13: Carbon calculators

Since I’m storing all my literature review information my LaTeX document, there are a fair number of URLs listed. I figured there must be a way to get LaTeX to generate PDFs with clickable links, and sure enough there is. The hyperref package has lots of nifty stuff, including making URLs clickable and making internal document references also clickable. Since I’m using this LaTeX Makefile, which produces output via LaTeX -> DVI -> PS -> PDF, I also need the breakurl package.

Here’s the code I’m using, which should be the last stuff before the \begin{document} :

%% Make URLs clickable
\usepackage[colorlinks, bookmarks=true]{hyperref}

%% Since I'm using the LaTeX Makefile that uses dvips, I need this
%% package to make URLs word wrap nicely
\usepackage{breakurl}

Preliminary results from the carbon calculators are interesting. Using my own personal data, Carbon Counter believes my emissions from air travel this year total 20.58 metric tons of CO2, while Dopplr‘s estimate for my air travel plus all the driving during my road trip totals 5.87 metric tons of CO2, a very different number. Carbon Counter sells carbon offsets (their calculator seems designed mostly as an input to tell you how many carbon offsets you should buy), so it would be in their financial interest to skew results higher. However, it’s too early to tell why the calculations are different. Carbon Counter has a nice page explaining how they calculate the values, and I haven’t investigated how AMEE (the service used by Dopplr) does the calculations.

No word from Dopplr on whether they would add a method to their API to extract the carbon data from trips. If they are unable or unwilling to do so, I could use the API to extract the travel information and send it to AMEE myself.

Other than continuing my reading, the big task for this shortened week is to crank out a first draft of my tech report.

Planned items from last week:

  • Read 2 new papers from literature review list
    • [DONE] Leveraging Social Networks To Motivate Individuals to Reduce their Ecological Footprints
    • [DONE] Do increases in energy efficiency improve environmental quality and sustainability?
  • Write up notes from papers read during PET paper lit review
    • [DONE] Challenging Comfort & Cleanliness Norms Through Interactive In‐Home Feedback Systems
  • [STARTED] Run through carbon calculators with my data
  • [DONE] Fix LaTeX table
  • [DONE] Follow up on Dopplr API request

Other accomplishments this week:

  • Figured out how to use ssh-agent on Leopard, so my script to sync my proposal and tech report doesn’t prompt me for my password more than once per session
  • Figured out how to make hyperlinks in LaTeX
  • Dug through old email messages for additional things to read, added to queue

Hours worked: 17 (target: 15 hr)

Plans for coming week:

  • Write first draft of tech report
  • Read 2 new papers from literature review list
    • Carbon neutral – sense and sensibility
    • How Much Energy Are We Using? Potential of Residential Energy Demand Feedback Devices
  • Write up notes from papers read during PET paper lit review
    • Promoting Environmentally Sustainable Behaviors Using Social Marketing In Emerging Persuasive Technologies
  • Finish running through carbon metric calculators

Pointers to work products:

Cool links:

  • Nothing of note

Week 12: Dopplr data

I spent some time working with Dopplr this week. It now has email import features of the type that make TripIt so popular. I haven’t tried email input yet since I’m not traveling. There is a Dopplr API, but it doesn’t appear that the carbon footprint information is available via the API. I have submitted a request to add carbon querying to the API, and someone from AMEE has replied that Dopplr would need to expose the AMEE ID and then the data could be directly downloaded from AMEE. AMEE is looking like it might be a core part of PET, since they do carbon footprint calculations for all sorts of input data.

Someone created something called Offsettr that uses the Dopplr API to calcuate carbon footprint information for your entire Dopplr “fellow traveler” network from the trip distance information, but it assumes all travel is by plane.

I already had input all 3 of my trips this year into TripIt, so I was looking for a way to import them into Dopplr. The officially suggested method for doing this is to have Dopplr subscribe to TripIt’s iCal feed (also described in slightly more detail elsewhere), so I tried that. It worked OK for trips where you fly into one place and then fly out, but it only picked up the first leg of my multi-hop road trip in the Pacific Northwest. After considerable manual editing (and some nasty issues with the Dopplr web interface), I got that all entered properly. I then checked out the carbon footprint it calculated for me: 5,871 kg CO2! Yipes! Here’s the graphic:

My carbon footprint calculated by AMEE via Dopplr

My carbon footprint calculated by AMEE via Dopplr

Other ideas I had this week. The Darby paper on the effectiveness of feedback on energy conservation got me thinking about ambient displays. How should one display information about usage (electricity, etc) that is informative, but uses very little power for the display? Large computer or TV displays are the canonical choice, but that uses a fair amount of electricity. Perhaps something mechanical that moves, like a gauge or clock? Electronic ink?

Getting electricity usage for a particular appliance is easy (Kill-A-Watt), and getting usage for a whole house is also straightforward (The Energy Detective). But ideally you’d like information about total information usage plus usage data for every device plugged in. Maybe a total energy meter plus something like what’s described in At the Flick of a Switch. The Device-Level Power Consumption Monitoring paper describes a wireless system for aggregating data from plug loads throughout an area, but that will require a bunch of the meters, one for each device you want to monitor.

It would be great if HECO had live energy graphs like these ones that LBNL created during the California power crisis that showed the current usage, forecast usage, and capacity. It could also break down the capacity based on different types of generation: oil, coal, wind, etc.

Planned items from last week:

  • Read 2 new papers from literature review list
    • [DONE] New Ways to Promote Proenvironmental Behavior: Expanding and Evaluating Motives for Environmentally Responsible Behavior
    • [DONE] The effectiveness of feedback on energy consumption
  • Write up notes from papers read during PET paper lit review
    • [DONE] Device-Level Power Consumption Monitoring
  • [DONE] Put carbon footprint calculators in table form in LaTeX
    • The table exists, but the URLs are too long so the table goes off the page. Gotta fix that.
  • [NOT DONE] Run through carbon footprint calculators with personal data
  • [DONE] Check out Dopplr’s carbon tracking for travel

Other accomplishments this week:

  • Requested Dopplr add API method for retrieving carbon footprint

Hours worked: 15 (target: 15 hr)

Plans for coming week:

  • Read 2 new papers from literature review list
    • Leveraging Social Networks To Motivate Individuals to Reduce their Ecological Footprints
    • Do increases in energy efficiency improve environmental quality and sustainability?
  • Write up notes from papers read during PET paper lit review
    • Challenging Comfort & Cleanliness Norms Through Interactive In‐Home Feedback Systems
  • Run through carbon calculators with my data
  • Fix LaTeX table
  • Follow up on Dopplr API request

Pointers to work products:

Cool links:

  • Get Satisfaction is a web site that allows users to ask questions and post ideas about companies. Companies can register employees who can post official responses, and users can help other users. It’s an outsourced social support service, basically.

Week 11: defining carbon footprint

I’ve been talking about “carbon footprint” as if it were a well-defined concept, but it turns out that it can be hard to nail down. I read a report that delves into how to define carbon footprint: do we include methane? what about NO2? what about emissions that don’t come from burning fossil fuels? There’s also the question of what units to represent carbon footprint in (some have suggested that it be measured in the amount of area of forest required to sequester the emitted CO2). In the end the authors come up with this definition:

The carbon footprint is a measure of the exclusive total amount of carbon dioxide emissions that is directly and indirectly caused by an activity or is accumulated over the life stages of a product.

They also discuss the methods one can use to compute carbon footprints. Perhaps unsurprisingly, calculating something’s carbon footprint is difficult. For a product or process, a bottom-up approach is suggested, but this doesn’t capture all of the indirect emissions from the supply chain. The environmental input-output method can take into account all the higher-order impacts, but works best at the more macro level of a government or industry sector.

Per Philip’s suggestion, I created a separate CSDL tech report that I will use to take a snapshot of the literature review from my proposal at the end of the semester. This snapshot will be submitted as my final report for ICS 699 this semester, and also will make up a major portion of my research portfolio (to be submitted in January 2009). To accomplish this I removed the content of the literature review chapter from my proposal body LaTeX file and put it in its own file. I left the \chapter{} in the proposal body since I don’t want that included in the tech report. However, the \include{} command does not allow chaining and the body of the proposal is already included into the main document. This helpful page (why are most LaTeX FAQs and tutorials written by graduate students working on their dissertation?) explained that \input is the other way to insert content from another file, and it allows chaining and doesn’t create a new page, which is exactly what I wanted.

Using symbolic links, the tech report includes the content of the literature review from the proposal, and also the BibTeX file. When I make the snapshot at the end of the semester, I’ll “break” the symlinks and replace them with copies of the linked file to ensure that the tech report doesn’t keep changing as the proposal changes.

Planned items from last week:

  • Read 3 new papers from literature review list
    • [DONE] Learning Transportation Mode from Raw GPS Data for Geographic Applications on the Web
    • [NOT DONE] New Ways to Promote Proenvironmental Behavior: Expanding and Evaluating Motives for Environmentally Responsible Behavior
    • [DONE] A Definition of ‘Carbon Footprint’
  • [NOT DONE] Check out Dopplr’s carbon tracking for travel
  • Write up notes from papers read during PET paper lit review
    • [DONE] Motivating Environmentally Sustainable Behavior Changes with a Virtual Polar Bear
  • [DONE but not in table form] Start list of carbon footprint calculators, shown in table form in proposal document

Other accomplishments this week:

  • Created a separate CSDL tech report 08-03 to be submitted as my final report for ICS 699 this semester, and to include in my research portfolio. It uses the same underlying content as the literature review chapter from my proposal via symlinks. Isn’t LaTeX great?
  • Wrote quick script to backup my proposal (and tech report) directory to dasha via rsync

Hours worked: 15 (target: 15 hr)

Plans for coming week:

  • Read 2 new papers from literature review list
    • New Ways to Promote Proenvironmental Behavior: Expanding and Evaluating Motives for Environmentally Responsible Behavior
    • The effectiveness of feedback on energy consumption
  • Write up notes from papers read during PET paper lit review
    • Device-Level Power Consumption Monitoring
  • Put carbon footprint calculators in table form in LaTeX
  • Run through carbon footprint calculators with personal data
  • Check out Dopplr’s carbon tracking for travel

Pointers to work products:

Cool links:

  • Doodle is a super quick way to do informal surveys. The primary thing I use it for is coordinating a meeting time between a group of people. You select the set of days and time slots during those days, send the URL out to the people involved, and Doodle will compute which day and time works best. I especially like that you don’t have to create an account to make or participate in a poll, which makes it viable for scheduling with busy people.
  • DropSend is one of the many services designed to let you email large files to people. You send the email through their web interface, the large file (up to 1 GB) is uploaded to their server, and the recipient gets an email with the (temporary) URL to the file. Drop.io is another data storage service, which allows data input via a variety of methods but allows file storage without creating an account. The downside is that their free service only allows 100 MB, which was too small for my immediate needs.

Week 10: thoughts on air travel

This week was more reading from my ever growing reference list. I’ve now organized my list of possible things to read by sections since it was getting pretty cluttered. It comes at the end of my Related Work chapter. I’m finding that a LaTeX document isn’t the greatest place to collect links, but it’s workable.

I came across this somewhat depressing article on how green consumers tend to be major carbon emitters. People who were most environmentally conscious (recycling, reducing car usage, etc) were also the one’s most likely to take long airplane flights, which wipes out any savings made in the home. I have to track down the actual paper, but it sounds like the environmentally conscious folks were the wealthiest, thus giving them the ability to take long flights. I hope that having a unified interface such as the one proposed in PET would help people to see the whole picture of their environmental impact.

If airplane flights really are the dominating factor in carbon emissions for most middle-class people, then that has a particularly nasty impact for Hawaii residents, since we live 2000 miles away from almost everything. Other than flights to neighbor islands, all flights are long flights and there is no practical alternative to flying. However, if flights are the biggest problem, then that could provide renewed focus on ways to avoid air travel. While it’s hard to imagine a realistic IT-based alternative for vacations, advances in telepresence could conceiveably make flying away for business meetings unnecessary.

My love affair with BibDesk continues. This past week I discovered the web import functionality. BibDesk provides an embedded WebKit browser that you can use to search a website like the ACM Portal for papers. When you find one that you are interested in, BibDesk can import the bibliographic data with one click. Nice.

Per discussion with Philip, need to read 3 papers a week to stay on target for literature review. At the end of the semester, I’m going to take a snapshot of the literature review chapter and turn that into a separate tech report that I’ll turn in as the document for ICS 699 and as a portion of my research portfolio.

Planned items from last week:

  • Read 4 new papers from literature review list
    • [NOT DONE] Learning Transportation Mode from Raw GPS Data for Geographic Applications on the Web
    • [DONE] Energy efficiency: rebounding to a sound analytical perspective
    • [NOT DONE] New Ways to Promote Proenvironmental Behavior: Expanding and Evaluating Motives for Environmentally Responsible Behavior
    • [NOT DONE] A Definition of ‘Carbon Footprint’
  • [NOT DONE] Add more sensors to list
  • Write up notes from papers read during PET paper lit review
    • [DONE] EcoIsland: A System For Persuading Users To Reduce CO2 Emissions
    • [DONE] Taking the Guesswork out of Environmentally Sustainable Lifestyles

Other accomplishments this week:

  • Emailed author of Understanding Mobility Based On GPS Data

Hours worked: 12 (target: 15 hr)

Plans for coming week:

  • Read 3 new papers from literature review list
    • Learning Transportation Mode from Raw GPS Data for Geographic Applications on the Web
    • New Ways to Promote Proenvironmental Behavior: Expanding and Evaluating Motives for Environmentally Responsible Behavior
    • A Definition of ‘Carbon Footprint’
  • Check out Dopplr’s carbon tracking for travel
  • Write up notes from papers read during PET paper lit review
    • Motivating Environmentally Sustainable Behavior Changes with a Virtual Polar Bear
  • Start list of carbon footprint calculators, shown in table form in proposal document

Pointers to work products:

Cool links:

  • Checks are now (apparently) the most dangerous way to give someone money. Every check has both the bank routing number and your account number, and with that information a criminal can pull money out of your bank account with far fewer protections than if they were stealing your credit card number.

Week 9: more reading and reference collecting

One of the types of sensors I’m looking at are mobile GPS sensors that attempt to determine what mode of transportation one is using, and from that and the GPS trajectory estimate one’s environmental impact (carbon footprint in particular). I’ve found 3 systems doing this so far:

  • Carbon Diem (previously known as Carbon Hero). Carbon Diem is designed to run on GPS-enabled mobile phones (Blackberry and Nokia N-series now, but “platform and provider agnostic”). As this article indicates they have been working on the system since 2006. They are trying to raise money, and focusing on the corporate market initially. The app claims to “tell if you drive, fly, take the train or walk”, and if they can sign a deal with a carrier or handset maker they could potentially launch to consumers in Spring 2009. According to this Guardian article, “the software was almost 100% accurate in working out when people were on airplanes or trains; it was between 65-75% accurate at guessing when people travelled on buses”.
  • Ecorio is a similar application for Google’s Android platform. It also uses GPS to detect the mode of transportation, and estimates carbon output from that. There is apparently support for detecting how efficiently you are driving, which is an interesting twist (though not sure how you provide the feedback when the user is driving). Ecorio also provides suggestions for reductions, such as links to Google Transit, and carpooling info. There appears to be some “what if” functionality built in as well, such as how much carbon will I emit if I start taking public transit half the time (screenshot in this article). Users can also purchase carbon offsets from the phone. There are plans to port the application to other platforms (iPhone is mentioned, but would be difficult given the restrictions on background processing). I wonder if this can be run in the Android SDK simulator, with Bluetooth GPS as input?
  • UCLA’s Personal Environmental Impact Report is another phone-based system. Currently in closed beta, runs on Nokia GPS-enabled phones. They are including other environmental factors, like smog.

It would be interesting to get a hold of some of these sensors and see how accurate they are compared to just recording the odometer & fuel usage information, or marking commutes on a map from memory.

I’m really liking BibDesk, the Mac OS X BibTeX manager. One really nice feature is being able to link URLs or local files to references. So you can save a PDF of a paper to your hard drive and link the BibTeX record to the file for easy access. It can also show you a nearly instant preview of how the currently selected item will be rendered in LaTeX. There are a bunch more features I haven’t dipped into yet, such as auto generation of cite-keys and automatic managment of your PDFs.

I’m still not quite sure how to cite web sites. For now I’m using the misc BibTeX type, and putting a \url{http://...} in the Howpublished field, which seems to produce reasonable output.

Planned items from last week:

  • Read 4 papers from literature review list
    • Understanding mobility based on GPS data [DONE]
    • Learning Transportation Mode from Raw GPS Data for Geographic Applications on the Web [NOT DONE]
    • Displaying dynamic carbon footprints of products on mobile phones [DONE]
    • Energy efficiency: rebounding to a sound analytical perspective [NOT DONE]
  • Start building table of possible sensor inputs [STARTED]
  • Add publications from PET workshop paper to BibTeX [DONE]

Other accomplishments this week:

  • Added a bunch of papers to lit review on Khazzoom-Brookes Postulate
  • Added several more papers while tracking down references from PET paper

Hours worked: 15 (target: 15 hr)

Plans for coming week:

  • Read 4 new papers from literature review list
    • Learning Transportation Mode from Raw GPS Data for Geographic Applications on the Web
    • Energy efficiency: rebounding to a sound analytical perspective
    • New Ways to Promote Proenvironmental Behavior: Expanding and Evaluating Motives for Environmentally Responsible Behavior
    • A Definition of ‘Carbon Footprint’
  • Add more sensors to list
  • Write up notes from papers read during PET paper lit review
    • EcoIsland: A System For Persuading Users To Reduce CO2 Emissions
    • Taking the Guesswork out of Environmentally Sustainable Lifestyles

Pointers to work products:

Cool links:

  • Nothing I can think of

Week 8: BibTeX & BibDesk for annotated bibliographies

I made substantially less progress in the past week than expected for two reasons. First, a crisis came up in LILT that required me to urgently work on SocialSense. Second, as part of the Sustainable Saunders Energy Group, I was notifying the occupants of the sixth floor of the Saunders building about upcoming nighttime air conditioning shutdown that should save at least $100K annually. Hopefully both situations have subsided for now and I can focus on the sustainability research this week.

I was looking for a way to get my literature review notes into my proposal document (per Philip’s request) in a sane and maintainable way. As I read each paper, I make notes (usually just bullet points) and once I have reached a stopping point (like the end of a semester) I assemble them into something conceptually coherent. I decided the best way to do this is to enter all the papers I read into my proposal BibTeX database, and place my notes in the annote field. BibDesk is a sweet Mac OS X GUI for maintaining BibTeX databases, and has easy access to the annote field. Then the key was getting the notes into the document. There are BibTeX styles (.bst files) that provide different bibliography styles, and some will print the annote fields of each referenced item, producing an annotated bibliography. I ended up using the annotation style, which ships as a standard part of TeX Live 2008. There are other annotated bibliography styles that could be installed, but I decided to go with the built-in one for now. Obviously I will switch back to the normal bibliography style when the literature review section is done.

Planned items from last week:

  • Read 2 papers from literature review list
    • Understanding mobility based on GPS data
      • Not done
    • Learning Transportation Mode from Raw GPS Data for Geographic Applications on the Web
      • Not done
  • Start building table of possible sensor inputs
    • Not done
  • Add publications from PET workshop paper to BibTeX
    • Not done

Other accomplishments this week:

  • Fixed formatting on my research portfolio per Philip’s suggestions
  • Moved literature review notes into proposal document per Philip’s request via annotated BibTeX entries

Hours worked: 6 (target: 15 hr)

Plans for coming week:

  • Read 4 papers from literature review list
    • Understanding mobility based on GPS data
    • Learning Transportation Mode from Raw GPS Data for Geographic Applications on the Web
  • Start building table of possible sensor inputs
  • Add publications from PET workshop paper to BibTeX

Pointers to work products:

Cool links:

  • Caffeine, a Mac OS X application that allows disabling sleep, screen dimming, and the screen saver via a menu bar item. This is really handy for presentations, so you don’t have to keep moving the mouse to keep your system awake. There’s even a timer functionality so it only stays “awake” for a fixed amount of time, so you don’t have to worry about forgetting to turn it off. Freeware.

Week 7: LaTeX style and outline

I wasn’t as productive this week as I had hoped to be. I was feeling under the weather on Thursday and Friday, which cut into my research time. I didn’t make any progress on reading more papers, and I spent more time than I had expected integrating the latest (if you can call something from 2000 latest) LaTeX thesis style changes from the bowels of bertha into the public Google Code repository. The good news is that I don’t expect to have to spend much more time on the thesis style, though it would be good for someone to go through it once in comparison with the latest style guide from grad division. Mark Stillwell has indicated a willingness to do that update.

I’m hoping to have at least 20 new items for my literature review by the end of the semester, so given the number of weeks left, I should be reading papers at a steady rate of at least 2 per week. That’s going to be a recurring item on my weekly todo list.

The other area I need to work on is collecting all the various potential sensors into one list so I can start concentrating on which ones I will be using for my research.

Planned items from last week:

  • Read 4 papers from literature review list
    • No progress
  • Look at websites with related functionality from list
    • No progress
  • Add publications from PET workshop paper to BibTeX
    • No progress
  • Write up outline of final tech report
    • My final tech report is my proposal, so filled in the chapters with an outline
  • Fill in more parts of research portfolio

Other accomplishments this week:

Hours worked: 7 (target: 15 hr)

Plans for coming week:

  • Read 2 papers from literature review list
    • Understanding mobility based on GPS data
    • Learning Transportation Mode from Raw GPS Data for Geographic Applications on the Web
  • Start building table of possible sensor inputs
  • Add publications from PET workshop paper to BibTeX

Pointers to work products:

Cool links:

  • None